Thursday, June 23, 2016

Are you ready for retirement?

One hundred percent of us expect to have a good retirement, but more than half of us don’t know how to save for it. The key is making a plan to save, invest, and protect your assets and understand your benefits. On Tuesday, June 28 at 2:00 p.m., join Diane Childs from the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation, and Kimberly Herrmann from the Social Security Administration for a non-biased discussion on earning, investing and maximizing your nest egg. They will go over basic savings and investing, choosing a financial planner, protecting your assets from fraud, and understanding your Social Security benefits. 

Diane Childs
Diane Childs is the financial information outreach coordinator for the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation, a state agency that regulates a number of financial services and products including investments, insurance and mortgages. She travels the state to educate consumers and businesses about the basics of investing, and how to prevent identity theft, financial fraud and predatory lending. She has been with the division for eight years and has talked to more than 350 businesses, organizations, service clubs, retirement communities and professional associations. She has a passion for consumer protection and adequately planning for retirement. Childs has a B.A. Journalism from the University of Oregon.
Kimberly Herrmann

Kimberly Herrmann is a Public Affairs Specialist with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Having worked as a Service Representative, Claims Representative and in the Leadership Management Program, Kimberly has extensive experience with SSA's many programs and conducts educational seminars and trainings throughout Oregon. Kimberly has resided with her family in Oregon since 1994. She and her husband enjoy being outdoors, and have just taken up backpacking. 


 This program is free and open to the public.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Learn to tell your story!

Do you have a story you'd like to tell?  Would you like to learn techniques to bring your story to life?  On Saturday, July 16 at 2:00 p.m. you can join Lawrence Howard and Lynne Duddy, the founders of Portland Story Theater, for a lively, interactive two-hour workshop on the contemporary art of personal storytelling. 

Lynne Duddy
As participants, you will learn how to identify your stories and what it takes to share them with an audience. The instructors teach intentional storytelling where people will learn how to tell stories improvisationally by being resourceful and using the power of spontaneity. Their approach teaches participants to trust the story and speak extemporaneously from the heart. You’ll get a chance to learn about story structure, the power of presence, the differences between writing and telling, and how to find the story that you need to tell. Portland Story Theater will perform excerpts from their stories, while engaging participants to begin exploring stories of their own. 

While this workshop is free, participation is limited to 25. To register, contact the library at (541) 265-2153, or come in to to sign up.

Lawrence Howard
Howard is a master at crafting engaging stories that often have listeners on the edge of their seats. Founder of Portland Story Theater, Lawrence draws from his rich repertoire of adventure, personal, and mythic tales to create narrative programs for people from all walks of life. Lawrence is best known as the creator of the Armchair Adventurer series, which include riveting stories about Antarctic explorers Ernest Shackleton, Douglas Mawson, Roald Amundsen, and Robert Falcon Scott.

Duddy is a narrative artist who creates captivating stories that draw listeners into the realm of real life. Founder of Portland Story Theater, Lynne draws from her rich repertoire of personal experience to create narrative programs for people from all walks of life. She coaches individuals and conducts workshops in storytelling throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Everyone Brave is Forgiven




In this novel by Chris Cleave, characters are drawn from the 1940's British class system and singled out in the act of living in war torn London and through the siege of Malta.  

At eighteen, Mary leaves finishing school for an opportunity to serve in similar capacity as her father somewhere within the diplomatic corps but finds herself placed instead as a primary school teacher shepherding London’s children to refuge in the countryside.  Her immediate supervisor, Tom, must accommodate her choice to stay behind instead.  Meanwhile, Tom's flatmate, Alistair, finds himself closing the collection at the Tate Museum as it is shipped to safety in Wales.  Without his occupation as conservator to steady him, he volunteers with the army.

Cleave's characters are seemingly rudderless against a drawing wave of violence as they make preparation to meet unknown challenges ahead.  Fortunately for readers, Cleave includes off-hand upper-class repartee which bolsters our morale and provides instances of hilarity where none could otherwise exist.



Based on the experiences of his own grandparents during World War II, Chris Cleave illustrates acts of 'ordinary courage' within each hour.  His narrative tests humanity’s capacity for moral integrity, physical endurance, and forgiveness in the face of horrendous destruction and loss.  Readers may discover new depths of compassion for contemporary war torn countries and families living through war's destruction.  You may reserve the book here.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Hugh Grant - About a Boy

The 2002 film, About a Boy will be shown at the Newport Public Library on Tuesday, June 14, at 6:30 p.m. The movie is based on Nick Hornby's novel of the same name.


Will Freeman (Hugh Grant) is a smooth-talking bachelor whose primary goal in life is avoiding any kind of responsibility. But when he invents an imaginary son in order to meet attractive single moms, Will gets a hilarious lesson about life from a bright, but hopelessly geeky 12-year-old named Marcus. Now, as Will struggles to teach Marcus the art of being cool, Marcus teaches Will that you're never too old to grow up.


About a Boy was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. Actors Hugh Grant and Toni Collette were nominated for a Golden Globe and a BAFTA Award respectively for their performances.

Friday, June 3, 2016

Are you signed up yet?

On your mark, get set and get ready for summer at your Library. Summer Reading sign-ups are happening now!

Library volunteer Tiby Cooperstein signs up young

Newport Public Library’s summer programs are a tradition and there’s a program for everyone. Programs begin the week of June 20 and are designed to encourage everyone to make reading a fun priority this summer. "Reading is the most important thing students can do to keep their brains active, engaged and learning over summer vacation, and it is FUN!" says Rebecca Cohen, Youth Services Librarian. Research indicates that students who do not read over the summer can lose up to one month of learning, resulting in a learning setback when school begins in the fall. That's why stocking up on reading materials over the summer is so important.

In addition to a variety of materials for children to read and listen to, Newport Public Library offers fun and educational events weekly including storytimes, and programs in Literacy Park.

The Library's summer program for children ages birth to 5 years include weekly storytimes and a chance to count the hours they are read to. After completing a reading chart, children receive a book bag, temporary tattoo and magnetic picture frame.

 "On Your Mark, Get Set ….READ!” is for children ages 5 - 12 years. Children set their own goal for how many books they’ll read or listen to this summer. When the goal is reached, the reader receives a free t-shirt sponsored by Thompson’s Sanitary Services, Inc.

 "GET IN THE GAME, READ" is the summer reading program for teens ages 12 to 18. Teens track their reading to earn raffle tickets for weekly prize drawings. Teen Thursday programs will continue throughout the summer with interesting things to do, make and learn. “Get in the Game” will end on August 18 with Library Olympics and a Grand Prize Drawing. Summer reading programs are for adults, too.

This summer the Library has a reading rewards program, “Exercise Your Mind, READ” just for grown-ups! Stop by the library to sign up and get a reading log. For every book (or eBook or audiobook) you read, fill out a raffle ticket for a chance to win one of twelve weekly prize drawings for fantastic literary gift baskets!

 Click here to find out more about the programs.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Good Eats


Digging around in my freezer the other day I found some overlooked berries.  Lifting the package out brought summer memories of drowsy bees foraging among the blackberry thorns, and our dog’s reproachful look as I halted our walk, set down my containers, rolled my sleeves up and reached in to pluck the ripe juicy fruit.

The frozen treasure also included blueberries that birds didn’t harvest and ripe huckleberries painstakingly sorted from the green and cleaned from miniature stems while swaying on the porch swing.  A few last raspberries were also tossed in as silent witnesses to my lost battle with the deer.  All were toted upstairs, dusted with sugar and tossed with tapioca to macerate overnight in the fridge before going into a pie.  

Everyone can appreciate a book that demystifies processes like cooking.  Here’s a fun example with a segment on green tomato pie (a great way to justify another attempt to grow tomatoes on the coast).  It is titled, United States of Pie:  Regional Favorites from East to West and North to South, by Adrienne Kane. You can reserve a copy here.

Or don’t grow it yourself.. Newport Farmer’s Market is again outside and right down Nye Street from the library every Saturday.  No need to miss out on nature’s bounty now or during the long winter months to come.  


 

Monday, May 9, 2016

What the Dickens?

Charles Dickens' stories are full of delighfully descriptive names: Ham Peggotty, Paul Sweedlepipe, Jeremiah Flintwinch, and Blathers are just a few I found a website called Name Nerds.  The story of Nicholas Nickleby is no exception, with appearances by Wackford Squeers, Charles Cheeryble, Newman Noggs, and Sir Mulberry Hawk.

The 2002 film version of Nicholas Nickleby is our May Literary Flick, and will be shown on Tuesday, May 10 at 6:30 p.m.

After the death of their father leaves them penniless, Nicholas and his sister Kate travel with their mother to London to seek help from their cold-hearted Uncle Ralph. Ralph's only intentions are to separate the family and exploit them. Nicholas is sent to a boarding school run by the cruel, abusive and horridly entertaining Wackford Squeers  and his wife.

Eventually, Nicholas runs away with schoolmate Smike, and the two set off to reunite the Nickleby family.  Once home, he meets a young woman, Madeline Bray, and has to protect her and his sister from the insidious scheming of his Uncle Ralph.



Join us at 6:30 for a star-studded cast* of Dickens' finest!  As always, we'll be serving free popcorn, too!

*Partial listing of cast
  • Charlie Hunnam as Nicholas Nickleby
  • Nathan Lane as Vincent Crummles
  • Jim Broadbent as Wackford Squeers
  • Christopher Plummer as Ralph Nickleby
  • Jamie Bell as Smike
  • Anne Hathaway as Madeline Bray
  • Timothy Spall as Charles Cheeryble
  • Tom Courtenay as Newman Noggs
  • Juliet Stevenson as Mrs Squeers
  • Romola Garai as Kate Nickleby
  • Stella Gonet as Mrs Nickleby